Tag: Serbia

Vladislav B. Sotirovic: Хрватска ’правашка’ хисториографија и Срби

Article „Хрватска ’правашка’ хисториографија и Срби“ („Croatian Historiography of ’Rights’ and the Serbs“), Зборник о Србима у Хрватској (Review of the Serbs in Croatia), Vol. 10, Serbian Academy of Sciences and Art, Belgrade, Serbia, 2016, ISSN 0353-5967, pp. 199−212.

Article by Vladislav B. Sotirovic: “The Destabilization of Macedonia? Greater Albania and the Process of ‘Kosovization'”, 2015

The last open armed conflict in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – FYROM (former Socialist Republic of Macedonia as one of six federal republics of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) is just an expected continuation of constant tensions between the ethnic Albanians and the Macedonian Slavs during the last quarter of century […]

READING ARTICLE FOR THE CREDIT COURSE BALKAN NATIONALISM AND ETHNIC CONFLICTS: “Sixteenth Anniversary of the War Against Yugoslavia: Surdulica, A “Good Day” for NATO?”

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) proclaims its “commitment to maintaining international peace and security.” Mainstream media rarely, if ever, look beyond Western self-justifications and bland assurances of moral superiority, and little thought is given to what NATO’s wars of aggression might look like to those on the receiving end.

During the first two weeks of August, 1999, I was a member of a delegation travelling throughout Yugoslavia, documenting NATO war crimes. One of our stops was at Surdulica, a small town which then had a population of about 13,000. We initially met with management of Zastava Pes, an automotive electrical parts factory that had at one time employed about 500 workers. In better days, annual exports from the plant amounted to $8 million. Western-imposed sanctions had stopped export contracts and prevented the import of materials, forcing a 70 percent reduction in the workforce and a decline in the local economy…

Article by Vladislav B. Sotirovic: “From The History of Anti-Russian Policy: The First Balkan Alliance (1866−1868)”

The creation of the First Balkan Alliance against the Ottoman Empire in 1866–1868 in the light of territorial requirements of the Balkan states and nations at the expense of the decreasing power of the Ottoman authorities and the Ottoman state integration was the first political-military treaty on the mutual cooperation by the Christian Balkan states and nations. The secret paragraphs of bilateral military-political contracts between Greece and Serbia and Serbia and Montenegro in regard to territorial inheritance of the Ottoman Empire in the Balkans are the most important points of the treaty.

Serbia became a leader of the Balkan coalition and the main champion of the idea that the “Eastern Question” had to be resolved by the Balkan peoples in the war against the Ottoman Empire without interference of the great European powers. The pivotal impetus for the making of the First Balkan Alliance came from the side of Serbia’s prince Mihailo I Obrenovic (1860−1868) whose predominate political task in the foreign policy was to create a South Slavic state under the Serbian leadership, which would be composed by all South Slavic territories in the Ottoman Empire. For that purpose he needed a cooperation of the other Balkan Christian states and the peoples as Serbia was not strong enough to solely defeat the Ottoman Empire. The most reasonable solution was to create a joint Balkan military-political defensive-offensive coalition which will military defeat the Ottoman Empire and expel the Ottoman authorities from the Balkans as a fundamental precondition for the creation of the united South Slavic state in the Balkans…

New monograph-book by Vladislav B. Sotirovic: “Serbia, Montenegro and the “Albanian Question”, 1878−1912: A Greater Albania Between Balkan Nationalism & European Imperialism”

This research project deals with history of the Balkan Peninsula in the 19th century up to the Balkan Wars at the beginning of the 20th century (1912−1913) when a new map of the South-East Europe was constructed. Narration on both wars tell us about decline of the Ottoman Empire, creation of new national states in the Balkans and changes in balance of the Great European Powers […]